Sometimes Saying "My Birthmom Didn't Want Me" Is an Adoptee's Coping Mechanism

"When you're adopted, at some level, your story is defined by a person who did not want you. Not wanting you may have been defined by wanting the best for you — in fact, most of the time it is." - Genes Aren't Destiny, & Other Things I've Learned From Being Adopted by Todd VanDerWerff

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Sometimes when I hear adoptees make a statement such as the one quoted above, it is a statement of protection. I know, firsthand how choosing to reunite or seek out your roots is quite a scary endeavor. Stating "she must not have wanted me," is a great way to help your brain to make sense of such a formative abandonment and thus allows us adoptees an easier excuse when making a choice not to face the unknowns a reunion may bring. If this is your tactic, it's good to know where the impetus lies. This statement often is not a truth coming directly from your birthparents mouth, but rather it's a coping mechanism to help stave off scary and hard feelings. That is an understandable strategy.

When I was denied by my birthmother the first time I laid eyes on her, it did feel a bit like a second rejection, but this does not prove that she did want me. I know that there are far too many pieces to her story and the circumstances surrounding my birth  to boil it down to a statement like "she did not want me." Having been in reunion now for a few years, I know that were I to continue to believe this, not only would I be lying to myself, but also it'd be a callous disrespect to my birthmom.

It is with such jubilation that I now know my birthmother, and that I've gotten the chance to hear her directly tell me that I was wanted! Being placed for adoption had absolutely nothing to do with her personal desires or want, but rather my placement in to foster care and ultimately being adopted, was the result of a host of other personal issues and systemic failures.

Give this article a read. The author is an adoptee, and has reunited with his birthparents. This blog post is not a reflection upon his life, as I've never met him in person. These are just my reflections on a sentiment I hear adoptees use quite often. I'm thankful to see this article in Vox as it is increasingly important to hear the point of view of courageous adoptees, whether we agree or disagree with what has been written.