Anticipating My Birthmother's Visit

Tomorrow my birthmother will be in town. Last night I watched Rain Man. Today I clearly see the correlation between these two happenings. This poem used to served as my desperate plea:

"I wish I could turn away and move on with my life

but my heart won't allow it when I try

That sounds so weak coming from me

a woman who overcame extreme adversities

If you don't want me to find you

whatever the reason may be

do me a favor and sign up to the registry

Send me a few pictures, a reason, and my medical history

give me some closure and set me free."

I used to wish that I could turn away from this search and reunion madness and move on with my life. I used to wish that I didn't need to fulfill this selfish curiosity of learning more about my roots. I waited for the magical moment when her name would match up with mine on the registry. I thought - if only I could see what she looks like, if only! Now I no longer need to fantasize, or try to wish away intrinsic desires. Now, I can simply ask her all of the 26 years of pent up questions.

While watching Rain Man last night, Charlie (Tom Cruise) attempted to convince his brother Raymond's court appointed psychiatrist that he should have legal custody of his brother so they could be together, as a family. Charlie said "I just don't understand. Why didn't dad tell me I had a brother? Why didn't anyone ever tell me that I had a brother? Because it'd have been nice to know him for more than just the past six days."  This statement cut to my core as Charlie no longer cared about the lure of a multi-million dollar inheritance, or his limited understanding his brother's autism or the extraordinary differences between his own self-centered living in Los Angeles and his brother's confined reality within the walls of the mental institution. He simply wanted to be with his brother. I'd imagine many adoptees can understand the beauty in seeing this seemingly incompatible duo spend these six days together.

I echo these thoughts of the convoluted and difficult to understand relationship. I find it to be superbly beautiful, uniquely refreshing and a clear definition of family. With all the differences between myself and my birth mother I nervously/contentedly await her arrival tomorrow, and look forward to allowing her to spend a few days with my family and I, AKA, her new family.